Navigational bar, Family Law Self-Help Center, with photo of a totem pole Return to the Family Law Home page Family Law Forms & Instructions Frequently Asked Questions Glossary of Family Law Terms Alaska Court System website Feedback form
 

Calculating Child Support - Frequently Asked Questions

What is child support?

- Child support is not optional
- Child support cannot be waived
- Children are entitled to support

Return to top

When do I owe child support?

Primary Divided
Shared Hybrid

Return to top

How is child support calculated?

According to Civil Rule 90.3

Where you can find Civil Rule 90.3:

Return to top

What does Civil Rule 90.3 say?

Civil Rule 90.3 discusses the different calculations to figure out the child support amount.  The specific calculation depends on your parenting plan.  Civil Rule 90.3 discusses how to calculate for primary custody, shared custody, divided custody, and hybrid custody.

Return to top

Return to top

How do I fill out the Child Support Guidelines Affidavit, DR-305 form?

Parents in cases involving child custody (divorce and custody cases) must fill out the Child Support Guidelines Affidavit DR-305 form (PDF | Fill-In PDF 651 KB). Fill out the column for yourself if you are the Father or the Mother. You may also fill out the column for the other parent if you know the information.

Please view How to Fill out the Child Support Guidelines Affidavit Adobe Acrobat PDF logo 603 KB.

How do I calculate child support for a primary custody arrangement?

To figure out the child support for a primary custody arrangement, do the following calculation:

1 kid: 20% 3 kids: 33%
2 kids: 27% More kids: 3% for each

If the calculation results in a support amount below $50.00, the support amount will be $50.00 a month.  The minimum calculation for a primary custody arrangement is $50.00.

If your AI is over $120,000, you may be eligible to use the high income cap. Rule 90.3 says that the portion of an adjusted annual income over $120,000 will not be used in calculating the child support amount, unless the other parent presents evidence showing the higher income should be used in the calculation.  If the cap is used, the AI will be $120,000 for the calculation.

Return to top

How do I calculate child support for a shared custody arrangement?

To figure out the child support for a shared custody arrangement, use the Shared Custody Child Support Calculation worksheet, DR-306 PDF | Fill-In PDF

Return to top

How do I calculate child support for a divided custody arrangement?

To figure out the child support for a divided custody arrangement, use the Divided Custody Child Support Calculation worksheet, DR-307 PDF | Fill-In PDF

Return to top

How do I calculate child support for a hybrid custody arrangement?

To figure out the child support for a hybrid custody arrangement, use the Hybrid Custody Child Support Calculation worksheet, DR-308 PDF | Fill-In PDF

Return to top

So what's the hard part?

Return to top

What counts as income?

Return to top

What can I subtract for deductions?

Rule 90.3 and the commentary lists other allowable deductions. Deductions allowed by Civil Rule 90.3 are not the same as those allowed for federal taxes.

The CSSD Child Support Calculator may be able to help you calculate deductions if you know your gross wages.

Return to top

Return to top

How do I figure out the deduction for retirement contributions?

When figuring out your annual adjusted income (gross income – deductions), you may deduct for:

For example:

You earn $40,000 gross wages/year.
6% of your wages goes into a mandatory retirement account ($40,000 x .06 = $2,400).
3% of your wages goes into a voluntary retirement account (deferred compensation, 401(k), TSP). ($40,000 x. .03 = $1,200).

Your total retirement contributions are 9% of gross wages. However, the total allowed deduction for both mandatory and voluntary retirement contributions is 7.5 % of gross wages. Because you have a mandatory 6% contribution, you can only deduct 1.5% of the voluntary contribution ($40,000 x .015 = $600). Both the mandatory contribution of $2,400 + the voluntary contribution of $600 = $3000.

So for this example when filling out the Child Support Guidelines Affidavit DR-305 form (PDF | Fill-In PDF 651 KB) Deductions in section B, next to:

How do I figure out the deduction for older children who live with me all or part of the time?

First, figure out how much of the time the older child(ren) live with you.  Is it a primary custody arrangement or a shared custody arrangement?  Once you figure out the custody arrangement, review the Prior Child Deduction chart Adobe Acrobat PDF logo to figure out how much to deduct. 

If primary custody, figure out how much child support you would pay for this child(ren) if you were paying support.  You can use the CSSD calculator by inputting your annual gross income.  It will provide a child support amount.  Take that amount and write it into the Child Support Guidelines Affidavit, DR-305 form (PDF | Fill-In PDF 651 KB) as a deduction in the appropriate spot "In-kind support for prior children of a different relationship calculated under 90.3(a)(1)(D)."

If shared custody, figure out the deduction by reviewing the Prior Child Deduction chart Adobe Acrobat PDF logo which provides the calculation.  Take that amount and write it into the Child Support Guidelines Affidavit, DR-305 form (PDF | Fill-In PDF 651 KB) as a deduction in the appropriate spot "In-kind support for prior children of a different relationship calculated under 90.3(a)(1)(D).”

Return to top

If I quit or take a lower paid job will I pay less child support?

Return to top

What if I am self-employed?

Return to top

What if my income varies a lot from year-to-year?

Return to top

How do I figure out how much the child(ren)’s health insurance costs?

The child support order will include information about the child(ren)’s health insurance coverage and the cost to cover just the child(ren). If the children are able to receive free medical services through the Indian Health Service or the military, the order will note it. If health insurance is available to one or both parents for free or at a reasonable cost, the child support order will state which parent must get health insurance. In general, the court considers the cost of health insurance to be reasonable if it is 5% or less than the adjusted annual income of the parent who may be required to purchase the insurance. Usually the order will split the cost of health insurance between the parents, although the court may order unequal payments if there is a good reason.

An obligor's child support obligation will be decreased by the amount of the obligee's portion of health insurance payments ordered by the court and actually paid by the obligor. A child support award will be increased by the obligor's portion of health insurance if the obligee is ordered to, and actually does obtain and pay for insurance. So you need to figure out how much it costs to insure just the child(ren) included in the child support order.

If the cost of covering the parent alone is the same as the cost of covering the parent and child(ren), then there is no additional cost to the parent for adding the child(ren); no portion of the cost of coverage may be allocated to the children. If dependent coverage can be added for a single cost, rather than per child, and the child(ren)’s coverage covers other child(ren) in addition to the child(ren) subject to the order, the cost to cover the child(ren) will be divided equally among all of the children covered by the insurance.

See the child health insurance diagram Adobe Acrobat PDF logo to figure out the cost to insure just the child(ren).

Return to top

What paperwork do I need to file?

Return to top

How do I file papers in court?

Complaint Answer Motion
Dissolution Notice of Filing Adobe Acrobat PDF logo  

Return to top

What happens after the information is filed?

Return to top

What happens if one side doesn't give the court the information?

It depends.

Return to top

Can the court ask CSSD to do the calculations?

Return to top

So what about CSSD?

CSSD is not automatically involved in your case unless the parent who receives child support is getting a public benefit. Usually, one party must apply for services.

Return to top

What is the difference between child support orders issued by the court and child support orders issued by CSSD?

Both the court and the Child Support Service Division (CSSD) have the authority to issue child support orders.  However, the child support orders come about in different ways.  The court must issue a child support order when it decides the custody and visitation arrangement for a child in a case involving divorce, dissolution, or custody between unmarried parents.  The CSSD issues an order when one parent requests child support because the parents have split up and the parent taking care of the child(ren) wants the other parent to pay support for the child.  Sometimes a parent will have a CSSD support order and then file a custody case in court later.  If the court issues a child support order that is different from the CSSD order, the court’s child support order takes priority and replaces the CSSD order.

Return to top

What about modifying?

There must be a change in circumstance:

Where you file depends on who issued the child support order you want to modify.

Return to top

How do I find out how much money the other parent makes?

Return to top

How can I find out if the opposing party applied for their PFD?

The court often orders the person who owes child support to apply for their own PFD. You can ask the PFD Office if someone has applied by calling:

  Anchorage:
Fairbanks:
Juneau:
Toll-free:
(907) 269-0370
(907) 451-2821
(907) 465-2326
(800) 733-8813

Return to top

What do I file to modify?

Return to top

Do I have to send copies of modification papers filed in court to CSSD?

Look at your case number to determine which office is handling your case:

Case numbers that begin with 1, 2 or 3:
Example: 1AN-08-8888, 2BA-08-8888
3AN-08-8888
Attorney General's Office
Collections and Support Division
1031 West Fourth Ave., Ste. 200
Anchorage, AK 99501
Case numbers that begin with 4:
Example: 4FA-08-8888
Attorney General’s Office
Collections and Support Section
100 Cushman St., Ste. 400
Fairbanks, AK 99701

Return to top

What can I do if the obligor lives in a foreign country?

The U.S. Department of State's Office of Children's Issues has a web page addressing international child support enforcement.

Return to top

Other resources

Return to top

Where do I find out more information about different stages of a case or specific topics?

This website has forms and information for all of the stages of the case. You can also find information about specific topics such as divorce, parenting and custody, paternity, property and debt division and dividing retirement benefits.

Return to top


Rev. 23 October 2013
© Alaska Court System

www.courts.alaska.gov
webmaster@akcourts.us

Adobe Acrobat PDF logo You'll need to download a free copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader in order to view and print documents with this symbol. If you are using a screen reader, get support and information at the Adobe Access website.